The (mostly) CW Review

The Flash and Arrow are taking a break until March 22 but I'm still posting Supergirl and The 100 reviews.

Supergirl: Solitude (Season 1, Episode 15)

“I have difficulty making conversation with men under 6ft tall.” – Siobhan

This episode definitely had its ups and downs: some aspects were amazing whilst others were just too cheesy.

Kara faced a cyber-villain, Indigo, who wanted the bring the end of the human race. Her estrangement from Hank and the DEO came to an end as she realised that they worked best as a team – this led to Alex admitting that she was the one who actually killed Astra. Winn became romantically involved with Siobhan whilst James’ relationship with Lucy came to an end.

The episode opened in Kara’s apartment and whilst this has no real bearing on the show, I have to ask: how can Kara afford that apartment? Seriously, I don’t know what the property market in National City is like but her place is beautiful and I don’t understand how she affords it on an assistant’s salary.

The idea of a cyber-hacking villain is very current and with a show that makes it its mission to fit as many pop-culture references into each episode, that’s not surprising. The first quarter of the episode in which it seemed as though they were just facing a human adversary were fantastic.

Our villain was a self-proclaimed ‘Font of Omniscient Knowledge’ called Indigo although my first thought upon seeing her was that Warner Bros. had ripped off Mystique. This was definitely one of the low points of the episode: she wanted to kill a lot of people but her motivations were weak and nothing distracted from the awful leotard costume.

I would love to see a spin-off show with just Cat Grant and events that occur at Cat Co. Cat continues to be the strongest supporting character and any scene involving her is great. That said, I would have loved for there to be more of her this episode. Instead, there was a lot more of Winn: since the Toyman episode, Winn hasn’t had a very active role but it feels as though his character is still developing.

We got to see the Fortress of Solitude but that felt more like fan service than a genuinely relevant part of the episode. Also, the Winn-James-Kara love triangle that we had all forgotten about has been resolved. Lucy was smart enough to realise that James was in love with Kara (although not smart enough to work out that Kara is Supergirl) so that relationship is over. On the other side, Winn seems to be entering a secret affair with Siobhan – they both have daddy issues so clearly they’re compatible. Basically, things have ended nicely so that Kara and James can be together.

Speaking of endings, Alex revealed that she was the one to kill Astra and that resulted in a truly lovely moment between Kara, Alex and Hank. We learnt a little bit more about Non’s plan – according to Indigo, it involves coexistence with humans – but there’s definitely still something ominous about it.

The 100: Thirteen (Season 3, Episode 7)

“Holy? It’s a corporate logo!” – Murphy

This was probably the most important episode of the season so far in regards to understanding how all of the previously separate story-lines come together.

In a particularly emotional episode, we saw how the world ended as a result of the AI, Alie, and how the 13th Ark station was destroyed, with the lone survivor taking a shuttle to Earth. Lexa ordered a blockade on Arcadia to be enforced by the entire army, whilst her relationship with Clarke developed. The episode ended with Lexa being killed by Titus.

I haven’t spoken a lot about Murphy this season but he’s always there in the periphery. From Season 1, every circumstance that he finds himself in should mean that he’s dead already but he’s relentless in his ability to survive. He’s by no means a “good guy” but he is a good guy. Murphy serves as a great anti-hero and as the season progresses it looks like he may take up a more central role. The episode ended with him and Clarke being locked away together and it doesn’t exactly seem like their future’s bright.

We finally have enough pieces of the puzzle to understand what’s happening: the City of Light, nightbloods, the thirteenth station is all beginning to make sense. We saw that the creator of Alie, Becca, was a nightblood and all of the commanders, such as Lexa, have a chip implanted within them of the second version of Alie. Honestly, writing it down makes it feel very complicated but it all makes sense: the show has done a great job of easing us into what could be a very confusing, and alienating, story-line.

Titus once again proved how dangerous he was capable of being when he killed Semet. It was the first time that we had really seen him fight and it became very clear that despite the fact that he held a less physical role he was still somebody to keep an eye on. Honestly, seeing the way he dealt Semet, the scene in which he attempted to kill Clarke wasn’t a huge leap.

This episode was focused on the relationship between Clarke and Lexa and I loved it. I love any scenes between these two characters – they’re ambassadors for giant groups of people but they’re also teenagers. Particularly with Lexa, it’s always nice to see her vulnerability: the first time I can recall seeing her lose her cool was in this episode when Titus brought up her ex, Costia, and that more than anything helped to show the strength of her feelings towards Clarke.

Clarke’s farewell scene with Lexa was beautifully directed which is why the following scene in which Lexa was killed is so jarring. It really seemed as though there was hope for the characters but then it was so quickly and cruelly snatched away.

I’m sorry that this week’s review was so short – like I said, The Flash and Arrow will be back later this month but until next week:

Do you want me to review any other shows in the interim? Let me know which ones. Are you onboard with the Winn/Siobhan realtionship? Did Lexa need to die?  Let me know in the comments.

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s